Malden Manor Mosaic Makeover

THE GRAND OPENING!

Watch the 30 second promo!!

Big new mosaic community mural coming South of the Borough!

Publiée par Save the World Club sur Samedi 9 février 2019

 

You are invited to the inauguration of Save the World Club’s latest breathtaking MOSAIC designed to lead Pre-Raphaelite aficionados to the spot just beyond where Millais painted the backdrop for the Iconic “Ophelia”.

Transforming a little used space into a tourist focus, just five minutes walk from Malden Manor Station, come and be awed by the craftsmanship of the numerous schools, religious groups and locals giving their creative best under the guidance of our expert Principle Artist; Kim Porelli.

Many thanks to all our supporters, sponsors, Community Officer Sophia Allinson whose idea this came from and RBK who helped us succeed with funding.

Refreshments

There will be lots of food – fruit, vegetables, bakeries and soft drinks free for all attending. Please bring bags or containers to take free food home in.

Provisional Programme

2 pm – Welcome from Prof Des Kay, Chair of Save the World Club introducing

– Dr Tariq Shabbeer, Secretary

– Roland Lawrence, Treasurer

– Kim Porelli, Principal Community Artist

Thanks to our Partners

– Sophia Allinson – Community Police Officer

– Marcia Burnett – Network Rail

– Challenge Students Rep

– Other partners

– Thanks to important volunteers

– Thanks to Royal Borough of Kingston Upon Thames Officers

2.15 pm – Short speech by the Mayor of Kingston

2.20 pm – Official unveiling and opening of the community mosaic

2.30 pm – Refreshments, viewing the mosaic and networking until 3.30pm

3 pm – Possible Football skills demo on 6 Acre Field with Fulham Football Club.

– Other fun activities for the family organised with Sustrans.

3.30 pm – End / Food Sharing / Clearing Up and Packing Away

We want to thank all our grant funders including:

  • the hundreds of individuals who donated to our Crowdfunding site;
  • Fulham Football Club;
  • the Esme Fairbairn Foundation;
  • the Awards for All, National Lotteries and;
  • Kingston Council Housing Department.

Finally, how could you help us?

1. We need Premises:

as a base for running our future activities:

  • to construct community mosaics and art work with volunteers;
  • for the short term storage of rescued fruit, vegetables, bakeries etc. in fridges and freezers.
  • We immediately give dried and tinned products to Kingston Food banks.

2. More Volunteers to:

make & install mosaics & clean up and restore Malden Manor and Kingston;

pick up and deliver rescued food to those in need in Kingston;

become future new Trustees to help us grow.

3. Any donations gratefully received for our charity, to do more good work with young people and community.

We are looking forward to meeting you.

For any further information contact:

Des Kay

Chair

Save the World Club

Tel or text: 07962 231830

Where Is It?

The site is located at the bottom of Sheephouse Way, in Malden Manor KT3 5PS.

Coming by car, there is plenty of free on street parking, right at the bottom of Sheephouse Way.

If you are coming by train, come to Malden Manor station. It is a 5 minute walk from there.

Turn right out of the station and walk towards the big roundabout.

Take the second left past Armiston House on your right and walk to the bottom of Sheephouse Way.

Follow the path towards the river. Turn left before the bridge and then it’s 100 metres to the work site under a railway bridge.

 

If you would like any further information, please find us on Facebook.  Please feel free to email me on tariqshabbeer@hotmail.com or ring or text me on 07443 508514 with any questions.

We would like to thank the Awards for All (National Lottery), Kingston Council’s Housing Department, the Esme Fairbairn Foundation, Fulham Football Club, Malden Manor Primary and Nursery School and the hundreds of donors to our crowd funding site that made this whole thing possible.

We hope you can join us and look forward to meeting you.

Save the World Club has 25 years working experience creating Award winning beautiful mosaics with the local community’s help around the Borough and main town.

We are delighted to announce that we succeeded in obtaining crowd funding for transforming a dark and grubby rail arch that is the entrance to Five Acre Field at Malden Manor just along from where Millais painted his famous “Ophilia” portrait. 

 

Moving ahead with the mosaics…

Sections of the mosaic are now being put together by members of the local community during the Summer workshop sessions at the hub at Armiston Garages on Sheephouse way near roundabout and junction with Manor Drive North……….look out for the pergola and bunting!!!      (Postcode KT3 5PW)

 

 

 

 

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Amateur sleuth discovers the site where Sir John Millais painted famous work of Ophelia

But one amateur art sleuth believes she has found the exact spot where one of Britain’s best-loved paintings was created.

Retired biology teacher Barbara Webb spent 18 months trying to find the real-life setting for Ophelia, Sir John Everett Millais’s £30million masterpiece.

Using historic sources combined with local knowledge, Miss Webb, 80, has concluded that the Pre-Raphaelite artist set up his easel in Six Acre Meadow on the west bank of the Hogsmill River at the bottom of the Manor House garden in Old Malden, South West London.

Famous painting: Millais completed the background by the river and later inserted the drowning Ophelia

Iconic: Ophelia, completed by Sir John Everett Millais in 1852, is worth £30million

 

Hogmill

Inspiration: The spot on the Hogsmill River believed to be the setting for the painting

She believes it was there almost 160 years ago that Millais painted the background, at the time regarded as one of the most accurate and elaborate studies of nature ever made.

He then added the figure of the drowning Ophelia after persuading 19-year-old model Elizabeth Siddal  –  later the wife of Millais’s friend and fellow Pre-Raphaelite Dante Gabriel Rossetti  –  to pose fully clothed in a cold bath at his studio.

She later caught pneumonia but survived.

Sleuth: Barbara Webb spent 18 months working out where Millais's painted his famous piece Ophelia

Sleuth: Barbara Webb spent 18 months

working out where Millais’s painted his

           famous piece Ophelia

The picture, now displayed at the Tate Britain, depicts the tragic Shakespearean figure who becomes mad with grief at the murder of her father Polonius by her lover Prince Hamlet. She falls into a river and drowns.

Millais was one of the founders of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood who rejected the 15th and 16th-century work of Raphael and his contemporaries Michelangelo and Leonardo in favour of earlier paintings.

Their ideas supported abundant detail, intense colours, and complex compositions.

It was known that Millais and fellow Pre-Raphaelite William Holman Hunt had worked near Hogsmill River, but Miss Webb wanted to find for herself the exact point.

Miss Webb, who lives in nearby Kingston upon Thames, studied the accounts of Millais and Hunt, as well as records from a local clergyman specifying the riverbank spot for the 1852 painting as being ‘100 yards’ above a particular footbridge.

 Miss Webb said: ‘I also studied the painting which gave me details such as the flow of water so I could work out which bank it was painted from.
 

Confirmed: An told walking map shows where the painting was then suspected to have been completed, but Miss Webb's research proved it

Confirmed: An old walking map of Malden shows where the painting was then suspected to have been completed, but Miss Webb’s research proved it

‘I was flabbergasted when I put the pieces together. The topography is the same, but there are more sycamore trees now and at the time it would have been much less shaded.’

Dr Alison Smith from Tate Britain said of Miss Webb’s detective work: ‘I think it is important. Millais would take his canvas and paint outdoors so with a bit of detective work if the sites are still there it is possible to find these places.

‘The painting is very accurate and to find the location brings the whole thing alive.’

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